Beyond Human | Eve Herold

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Medical advancements are taking shape which will drastically change our lives and allow us to live for hundreds of years beyond our natural lifespan. Yet, with these blessings come complicated issues. Some of which we can predict, others we cannot fathom.

What would you do if you were offered the opportunity to extend your life to an unnatural span of time (E.g.; 100 or more years on top of your natural lifespan). Would you take advantage of such advances in technology for the desire to continue living or would you rather age gracefully and die naturally? This, among other conundrums, is the focus point of discussion on today’s episode with our guest, Eve Herold.  

Personally, Bob would not want to extend his life if it meant he would be 100 or 200 years removed from the last time he had seen a loved one.

In this episode of Mysterious Matters, we discuss the information Eve received as she tapped the minds of leading edge doctors, scientists and engineers who are actively engaged in developing new ways of living with certain illnesses such as kidney disease, heart disease, degenerative retinal disease, and even aging itself.

By utilizing once futuristic technologies and medical advancements such as Nanotechnology and Stem Cells, we will one day realize a world without need for medications. For those who are on Dialysis due to kidney failure, there is hope through an artificial kidney (being worked on now!).

Those who are diabetic and depend on insulin (insulin pumps and even continuous glucose meters) we could see an artificial pancreas within the next twenty years; thereby effectively curing diabetes for those with type 1, type 1 ½, and type 2.

Scientists have even found a fat gene; they have been successful in shutting it off in mice. The next step is human testing.

 

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